PSLV-C51, the first dedicated launch by NSIL, successfully launches Amazonia-1 and 18 Co-passenger satellites from Sriharikota
Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre - an aerial view
Rohini Sounding Rocket (RH 200) getting ready for launch

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January 06, 2014

Indigenous Cryogenic Upper Stage Successfully Flight Tested On-board GSLV-D5

The Indigenous Cryogenic Upper Stage was successfully flight-tested onboard GSLV-D5 launch vehicle on January 05, 2014 from Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, Sriharikota. In this successful flight of GSLV-D5, a communication satellite - GSAT-14 - was launched very precisely to its intended Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit.

After a smooth countdown of 29 hours, GSLV-D5 lifted off at 1618 hours IST at the opening of the launch window. All the important flight phases, namely, the core stage and strap-on stage propulsion, payload fairing separation, second stage propulsion, cryogenic stage propulsion and spacecraft separation, were executed as planned.

After a flight of 17 minutes 5 seconds, GSAT-14 satellite was precisely injected into a Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit with a Perigee (nearest point to Earth) of 175 km and an Apogee (farthest point to Earth) of 35,945 km with an orbital inclination of 19.3 degree with respect to the equator.

Immediately after the injection, ISRO's Master Control Facility at Hassan took over the control and commanding of GSAT-14. The solar panels of the satellite were deployed as planned, the satellite health was found normal and the satellite was oriented towards the Sun. The first orbit raising operation of GSAT-14 is planned at 0758 hrs IST on January 6, 2014. The remaining two orbit raising operations are planned on January 7 and 9, 2014 to place the satellite in geostationary orbit.

January 06, 2014

Indigenous Cryogenic Upper Stage Successfully Flight Tested On-board GSLV-D5

The Indigenous Cryogenic Upper Stage was successfully flight-tested onboard GSLV-D5 launch vehicle on January 05, 2014 from Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, Sriharikota. In this successful flight of GSLV-D5, a communication satellite - GSAT-14 - was launched very precisely to its intended Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit.

After a smooth countdown of 29 hours, GSLV-D5 lifted off at 1618 hours IST at the opening of the launch window. All the important flight phases, namely, the core stage and strap-on stage propulsion, payload fairing separation, second stage propulsion, cryogenic stage propulsion and spacecraft separation, were executed as planned.

After a flight of 17 minutes 5 seconds, GSAT-14 satellite was precisely injected into a Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit with a Perigee (nearest point to Earth) of 175 km and an Apogee (farthest point to Earth) of 35,945 km with an orbital inclination of 19.3 degree with respect to the equator.

Immediately after the injection, ISRO's Master Control Facility at Hassan took over the control and commanding of GSAT-14. The solar panels of the satellite were deployed as planned, the satellite health was found normal and the satellite was oriented towards the Sun. The first orbit raising operation of GSAT-14 is planned at 0758 hrs IST on January 6, 2014. The remaining two orbit raising operations are planned on January 7 and 9, 2014 to place the satellite in geostationary orbit.

August 19, 2004

Airdrop Test for Space Capsule Recovery Experiment Successfully Conducted

The airdrop test of the instrumented Space Capsule Recovery Experiment (SRE) module was successfully conducted using a Helicopter today (August 19, 2004) from Satish Dhawan Space Centre (SDSC) SHAR, Sriharikota, about 80 km north of Chennai. Today's test was the third and the last of the three airdrop tests. The earlier two tests had been conducted from SDSC in June last. These thre tests were crucial for the qualification of SRE for its flight.Space Capsule Recovery Experiment (SRE) is intended for demonstrating the capability to recover an orbiting space capsule. The experiment envisages the development of a 500 kg recoverable capsule and the associated technologies. SRE will be launched on board ISRO's Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) during the second half of 2005.

SRE2

SRE1

After its launch by PSLV, SRE will remain in orbit for a few days during which it will be used to perform experiments in micro-gravity environment. The capsule will then be de-orbited and it re-enters the earth's atmosphere. On re-entry, after initial aerodynamic braking, a parachute system will reduce the touch down velocity. The SRE will splashdown in the Bay of Bengal, about 140 km east of Sriharikota coast. A floatation system will keep the SRE afloat and enables its recovery. The SRE is intended to test reusable thermal protection system, navigation, guidance and control, hypersonic aerothermodynamics, management of communication blackout, deceleration and floatation system, recovery operations, etc.

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February 18, 2002

Anna University to Develop Micro-satellite

Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and Anna University, formally announced on February 15, 2002 at Chennai, the proposed development of a micro-satellite by Anna University. The announcement marks a significant milestone in ISRO's pursuit to strengthen its University linkages that could help generate human resources for the space programme and build capacity in the Universities to undertake advanced research and development activities.

According to the announcement, Anna University will build the micro-satellite and ISRO will launch the satellite as a piggyback payload on its Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, PSLV. The satellite will be developed in about three years.

Being the first of its kind for an Indian University in spacecraft development, the micro-satellite will be a comparatively simple one weighing around 60 kg. It will have body-mounted solar panels generating about 40 Watt of electrical power and will be spin-stabilised. It will have a data store-and-forward payload for conducting experiments on message transfer across the country.

The micro-satellite development will be a good opportunity for the students and the faculty of Anna University to get an insight into the various aspects of space technology. It will also help them to conduct meaningful application studies and gain experience in satellite mission operations. Anna University will establish necessary facilities for the satellite development including a clean room for assembly and testing besides providing other support facilities to sustain the activity. ISRO will provide technical and managerial guidance, besides necessary financial support.

It may be noted that, globally, there has been an interest in the development of micro-satellites by several universities. It is one of the most cost-effective ways for human resources development in space technology. These micro-satellites could be used to test advanced technologies for future operational satellites or for larger scientific missions. The advantage of micro-satellites is that they can be launched as piggyback payloads along with a primary satellite like IRS thus making the Micro-satellite launch affordable. The Universities can provide a multi-disciplinary environment to combine the educational and research capabilities into a focused programme. It is in this context that the proposal for development of micro-satellite by Anna University assumes significance. This is expected to provide impetus for other universities to take up similar projects in the coming years. ISRO will pursue other leading educational institutions in the country to take up such ventures in order to enrich and build necessary capabilities within the university system and stimulate interests among the younger generation to take up challenging careers in science and technology.

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February 04, 2004

Special Atmospheric Aerosol Campaign Launched

ISRO, along with special national scientific institutions, has launched a special land based campaign on atmospheric aerosols. The campaign started on February 1 and will continue till February 29, 2004. During this special campaign, vehicles equipped with sophisticated instruments will travel about 6000 km in south India to measure physical, chemical and optical properties of aerosols and trace gases along the road corridors. The month of February has been specifically chosen for the campaign since, during this period, there will not be any draw down of aerosols due to precipitation and hence provide average conditions of aerosols in the ambient environment. The Indian continent, by virtue of its geographical position and anthropogenic pressures on land as well as development of industries, have resulted in rapid changes in the land use and land cover pattern.

These regional and geographical processes of Indian sub-continent, which is surrounded by Indian Ocean, are also influenced by the intercontinental transport of various atmospheric processes and trace gases making the continent as one of the conduit for accumulation of various green house gases, aerosols and trace gases. These atmospheric constituents play a major role in perturbing the radiation reaching the earth's surface. Some of the trace gases, though have short residence time, can perturb the radiation periodically. The problem of aerosols and atmospheric trace gases concentration appears to be on the rise over the Indian continent and there is a need to document the sources and composition of aerosols.

The "Special Land Based Campaign on Aerosols", would provide better insight on the properties of composition of aerosols and their distribution across various latitudes. The understanding of the aerosols characteristics and chemistry will help in better quantifying the atmospheric radiative forcing. It is also proposed to launch balloons and fly instruments in aircraft to study the vertical and advection of the constituents in the 4-5 km boundary layer. The present campaign, which is a part of the on-going Geosphere-Biosphere Programme, is the first of its kind in the country. ISRO proposes to cover the northern and north-eastern region road corridors in the next 2-3 years. ISRO has also plans to cover the Arabian and Bay of Bengal Oceanic region for accounting the aerosols and trace gas concentrations using ship-borne instruments.

The Institutions participating in the campaign include : National Remote Sensing Agency (NRSA), Hyderabad and Physical Research Laboratory (PRL), Ahmedabad of the Department of Space; ISRO's Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre (VSSC) Thiruvananthapuram; Central Road Research Institute (CRRI) New Delhi; National Physical Laboratory (NPL), New Delhi; Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune; Indian Institute of Science (IISc.), Bangalore; Andhra University, Vishakapatnam; and Sri Krishnadevaraya University, Ananthapur.

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